Some of my patterns

3 August 2012

Ros's bracelet

My friend Ros and I 'do' the charity shops on a Monday.  Not every Monday but most of them!!!
I was showing her the new bracelet last Monday and she liked it a lot.  So I got her to choose the colours she wanted so I could make her one.  Here it is.  I was being a bit sneaky as I really wanted to make another as I do enjoy the process of making the SSSR's!!

The pattern is now ready and can be found here. Believe me there were so many combinations that can be made with this idea that it was a hard time trying to keep brain cell 3 to one 'theme'.  

If you like this idea then please go and re-visit this page as the lanyard is done in much the same way.  It's just really a matter of getting the hang of the technique and then just 'doing your own thing'.

17 comments:

  1. Thanks for the pattern and the link to the explanation of the SSSR's! Do you also have a tutorial on avoiding a twisted picot? I do manage it most of the time, but barely, I hate I have to start over a lot, because it comes out twisted again and again.

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  2. You're very welcome to the pattern, goudenregen. I've never done a page on avoiding the twisted picot as I've never understood it myself!! I'm a bit lazy and all I do is lay the working thread behind the picot I want to join to and then pull it through. If you'd like to email me privately on lovetotat@gmail I'll try and explain further and do a drawing for you.

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    1. Whoa! Is this the rosette join that you are dismissing as superfluous? It is extremely useful. Thanks to Edwige Renaudin, via Frivole, a few of us have also just added the understanding that it is more versatile than we thought: i.e. the direction in which you fold the rosette to avoid the twisted picot determines whether you end up with the threads on the front or the back of the work. There are multiple options for avoiding the twisted picot: the rosette join; pass all threads to the front and do as you do; pass all threads to the back and make the join in the same manner. Of those three, the rosette is by far the easiest, and worthy of a tutorial page with the added information about direction of fold determining where the threads end up. Or, do I have entirely the wrong end of the stick, and you were talking about something completely different? (If so, I apologize for the outburst, and retreat; bowing obsequiously....)

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  3. Thanks, Jane! I think I'll give this one a try. I'm not sure why, but I can successfully complete SSSRs, but I have a terrible time with split rings. I haven't given up yet, but I do get extremely frustrated. I think it's all in the turn of the wrist.

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  4. Fabulous color combination!!! :)

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  5. Lovely bracelet and gorgeous colours, thank you for sharing the pattern
    Margaret

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  6. Love the bracelet - could be a festive holiday one easily!

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  7. The colours are great, really must have a go at SSSR's - how long have I been saying that?!!!

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  8. Do you know that because of your techniques page, I learned how to do a SSSR (or single color split ring) before I ever learned how to do a chain. lol I guess when you teach yourself, there's a chance that you learn things a little backwards lol I remember starting out and seeing videos and thinking it strange that the people in the videos were using two strings and sometimes two shuttles. Then, when I started googling on what to do with the second thread... I found your link. I can't remember when I discovered (or realized) that there weren't just rings lol

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  9. This is wonderful! I'm interested to try it!

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  10. Beautiful! I love your bracelets! I usually don't like the tatted jewelry I make but you are inspiring me to keep trying them!

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  11. Suzanne - I was answering gouderegen thinking she was talking about joining the last ring to a first ring where you fold the work and twiddle about with it. I've never ever understood the need for this as it's something I've never needed with the simple way I join. I had to find a way of doing this over 50 years ago as there was nobody to teach me and have never understood the 'need' or 'desire' for the folding thing. I actually have tried that on many occasions and failed dismally. Do I feel a technique page coming on here! If I'm on the wrong wavelength please let me know. NEVER retreat from a discussion like this - it keeps my old brain working!!!

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    1. Jane - I think we (you, me and gouderegen) are all talking about the same thing. The folding upward, or downward, of the first ring of a rosette, (or whatever element in a tight corner is to be joined), to facilitate the join, is extremely useful. The 'twiddly' bit is ingenious, and not difficult. The trick is not to over think it. Just insert the hook from back to front, rotate forward, catch working thread and join. Having the bulk of the tatting folded out of the way as you complete the final stitches of the ring/chain after the join is much easier. When I haven't used the join for a while and 'forget', I find page 70 of 'Tatting with Visual Patterns' a nice reminder. Linda Davies made a tutorial video for this a couple of years ago. It is a useful item to have in the tatting 'bag of tricks' - even if you are perfectly happy living without it.

      Thanks for not being miffed at my outburst. If it was empassioned, it is because I found the technique worth mastering.

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  12. Yay!

    Thanks for the pattern! I was awaiting eagerly for it - I am too curious and couldn't let go of the idea since your lanyard post!

    I just downloaded it and I am off to play! Genius, genius idea - I am sure it is much stronger than your ordinary SSSR chain. Very cool!

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  13. No way was I miffed, Suzanne. I'll never use that way of joining, though, as I find the way I do it so easy. Still can't get my head round the folding part!!! I guess you can't teach an old git new tricks, eh?

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  14. I found this tutorial, but it still looks so complicated. In other words a technique page would be so welcome! This is the link http://niftyneedle.blogspot.nl/2010/01/tatting-twisted-picot-join-tutorial.html
    I don't get it why it is so difficult (for me at least). Thanks for looking into this problem.

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    1. gouderegen - you said: "I found this tutorial, but it still looks complicated" - but did you actually try it? That particular tutorial is as clear an an explanation of how execute a folded join as can be. This is one of those techniques where the comprehension comes through doing. I would suggest that you make a small rosette and then follow the photos, step by step. If, after that, this method of joining still perplexes you, the approach that Jane described works just as well.

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