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15 June 2020

Moaning Monday


I wonder if it’s a language translation problem but why do some people call thread - ‘string’?  

To me string is something you use to tie things together.  I always think of string as being tough and quite a lot thicker than we use in mainstream tatting.

Is it something to do with translating from another language?

In the end I had to look it up with Mr Google and he says this.  I asked  him again in case he was telling me fibs and this is another definition.  

So today's Moaning Monday isn't really a moan at all - more a query!!!  

12 comments:

Jane McLellan said...

Lot of definitions for string but none that sound like tatting! I would think it's translation. I come across some funny translations, like boat for shuttle.

Lace-lovin' Librarian ~ Diane said...

I'm with you, Jane. String is used to tie things together. It might take a while, but I imagine we could tat with string to tie up special packages... not something I'd enjoy doing!

Maureen said...

I haven't yet come across " string" when the meaning is thread. I would find it intensely annoying too, but then I am a paid- up member of the Greengrocer's Apostrophe Eradication Club.

Jane Eborall said...

Thanks for your thoughts Diane and Maureen. I’d better be careful with you around, Maureen!!!!

dani, the geek said...

i use string as a catch-all to mean thread, string, or yarn. but i enjoy generalizing, sometimes... other times i use the term on the tin...

i've heard quite a few uses of all three words, and each industry seems to have its own definitions...

(full disclosure, i have also tatted with packing string, yarn, fishing line, etc.)

Jane Eborall said...

Oh, Dani, that’s one way of using the word ‘string’ as a generalisation. My string is too fuzzy to tat with - it’s gardening string.

Ninetta said...

Forgive my intrusion... about a possible translation problem, in Italian we have "stringa" (that is from Latin "stringere", tighten, the same word is in Italian too) and we use it as synonymous of thin rope or shoelace, often with those cap that helps to put it through holes. But I wouldn't use my "stringa" as synonymous for thread.

Jane Eborall said...

Ninetta you are NEVER an intrusion and I’m so grateful for you dropping this message in as I think that explains it all!!! You are a STAR. I guess that some people don’t think too hard or worry about the terminology so much!! It’s made an interesting Moaning Monday even though it wasn’t really a moan!!!!

Anonymous said...

The translations for thread that I've often encountered usually use the term 'wire' in English - something I've never tatted with, and probably never will. On the other hand, I HAVE tried tatting with string....which is best left for experimenting with crochet, not tatting. ;)
StephanieW

StringyDogs said...

Sigh. I'm a renegade once again. To me, "thread" is sewing machine size (my first exposure). "String" is a catchall for anything larger until you get to cord, line or rope.

Jane Eborall said...

You’re right, StringyDogs! Thread is for the sewing machine but I also use sewing machine thread for tatting so that’s - hang on, I’m getting myself mixed up now!!!! So do you call ‘my’ thread (crochet/tatting size) and knitting/crochet yarn all string? With your name (StringyDogs) you can call it whatever you like!!! I didn’t think my Monday Moan would be so interesting to so many people!!!!

Judith Connors said...

Just to complicate things further, we use 'thread' (mercerised), 'yarn' (woolly) and 'string/twine' without any overlap. :-)

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