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16 November 2020

The psychology of tatting

Well, maybe!!!
I was pondering about the whole psychology of this lace or any other craft, come to that.  

I read a lot of blogs and Facebook posts and sadly the main ‘aim’ it seems to me is quick gratification. By that, I mean, people mainly want something small and fast to make.  

This intrigues me as I’ve never felt that way about anything in life.  I’m happy to wait for gratification in all aspects of my life.  I’ll wait for anything.  If I order something online, or in a queue in a shop, waiting for a bus, etc, I don’t mind how long it takes - the anticipation is what makes my adrenaline flow.  I feel almost deflated when the item arrives or I get to the front of the queue.

I occasionally like to make something that only takes an evening but then I’m left with that feeling of ‘what’s next’?  So, to cope with my weird way of dealing with tatting projects is to have two projects (sometimes three) ‘on the go’.  One a short term one and the other a longer one - although I never commit totally to how long that long term one may be as at my age (77) you never know how long ‘long’ will take and if you’ll be around to finish.

So, I would say to the younger generation - make a commitment.  Both to what you’re making now and your life in general.  

Does that make sense and would you like a picture to liven this post up?


15 comments:

Jane McLellan said...

I love the bright daisy! Yes, I know what you mean. Elizabeth Zimmerman said that she likes to knit with small needles and fine yarn to prolong the pleasure of knitting. I certainly don't do megachunky! The other one that puzzles me is the remark I often hear - I wouldn't have the patience for that, from people who are sitting doing absolutely nothing. To me it takes more patience to sit idly!

Jane Eborall said...

Gosh, Jane, you're so right about sitting doing nothing. My father was an expert on that. He'd sit and stare into space for ages and ages. Never did understand that.

Jon Yusoff said...

I always have a long term tatting project going. My current project is a Jan Stawasz doily that is on the cover of his book, Tatting Theory and Patterns. I don't know how long that is going to take. Sometimes I go days without picking up. In between, I work on smalls, bookmarks mainly, that I would give away. I seldom have 'what's next' moments, I guess.

I totally agree with Jane McLellan on the 'doing nothing' bit. I couldn't even sit down just watching the tele without my hands working on something.

Jane Eborall said...

Lovely to hear from you, Jon. I wrote you a few weeks ago but not sure whether I got your email address right!!! I've now forgotten what I wrote about - old age, you know!!!!
If I sit and 'just watch' the telly I fall asleep!!! My long term project is the Fandango squares at the moment but I really need a reason for doing them now!!! An idea is brewing in my brain but it will be a VERY long commitment!!!

Eleanor said...

I agree. It's as much as the "journey" to get to the finished project as the finished project. It's very gratifying to work it out like a puzzle, to learn and explore, and feel the materials and process unwind in your hands, before your eyes, and in your mind!
The medallion's colors are lovely- thank you, Jane, and all you other ladies for sharing, teaching and challenging.

God's Kid said...

Love that tatted piece!!! :)
As for me, I notice the same thing about people wanting smaller projects to have a finished piece quicker, but I love larger pieces because so many want the smaller. I have a tablecloth still in progress and am in no real hurry to get it done. I work on several projects at a time for change of pace, color, and design. ;)

Jane Eborall said...

Yes, Eleanor, it’s the journey and, for me on this project, it’s the playing with colours too.
You’ve reminded me, God’s Kid, about a tablecloth I started about 50 years ago. It’s been through marriage, divorce, several house moves and I think it’s still in the house somewhere!!!! I will NOT be finishing it - that’s for sure!!! Like you I work on several things usually too but at the moment the Fandango has my full attention!!!

Bernice said...

I am all about the journey. Yes it is nice to finish but I have found that I am a much better starter and I like that about me. I enjoy the challenge that tatting still gives me. I have found patterns that comfort me and I return to them when needed. I also love the anticipation of the arrival of packages and I like your orange flower.

Marla said...

There is just too much impatience in the world today....
people need to learn that to do or make something good is worth your time and effort.... that being said.... I just tat because I need something to keep my hands and mind busy.... gotta channel that energy somewhere! 😳

Jane Eborall said...

Yes, Bernice, it is the journey and that’s applies to the whole of life too. Patience is (as the saying goes) a virtue that most tatters have been endowed with.
You’re so right, Marla. People aren’t prepared to wait for anything. Just look at the way cars are driven nowadays!!!!

il mio chiacchierino said...

si e condivido tutto quello che dici . Sei una grande persona!!!!!! Per me fare il chiacchierino significa rilassarsi, creare , condividere con gli amici anche lontani . ciao carissima

il mio chiacchierino said...

condivido quello che tu dici, il chiacchierino mi rilassa, mi consente di creare cose nuove, è appassionante

il mio chiacchierino said...

condivido quello che tu dici, il chiacchierino mi rilassa, mi consente di creare cose nuove, è appassionante

victats@gmail.com said...

I like having longer projects so I'm not constantly searching for something new to tat.

Jane Eborall said...

That’s a good point too, victats@gmail.com!!!! Mind, you can always start something new of your own design as that’s what you do so well.

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