29 July 2010

Just look at these


I'm a lucky lass.  I get to talk tatting with numerous people from all over the world.  A lot of my time each day is spent helping out with 'problems'.  

This is an idea I've been discussing with Jane from South Africa.   Just wish I'd thought of this!!!!  First is her original necklace and underneath are two stunners which I've simply GOT to try for myself.


This has led us to an interesting discussion and input from all would be very useful and interesting.  


The question is - when you make a 'string' of split rings with equal numbers of stitches on both sides does your 'string' curl?  Mine does.  WHY?  


The seahorses that I make all have equal sided split rings but their tails curl naturally (which is what I want).  They always curl towards the second side of the SR too.  Does this happen to everybody and if so how do you stop it if you want to?!?!?!  I hope that if I get lots of interesting comments AND the answer to the problem that I'll be able to find the 'reasons why' this happens!!!!




16 comments:

  1. I remember seeing this discussed somewhere. It has to do with stitches on one side being flipped and the other side wrapped. I don't remember the technical side of it but apparently one method takes up slightly more room or the formation of the stitch produces a different tension on each side. Can't remember where it was discussed though.

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  2. Mine do not curl. Maybe because its needle tatting? Curious....

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  3. passei por aqui só pra dizer ou bom dia!!!!!!!!!!!!! lindo os trabalhos nestas toalhas, aliás, achei tudo lindo por aqui!!!!! você está de parabéns pelos seus trabalhos..
    Tenha um bom fim de semana.. jinhossss Rosa

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  4. The string of split rings curls towards the 2nd side because of the construction of the split ring. The knots on the first side are created by the twisting of the ring thread by the core thread; the knots on the second side are applied to the core thread by a different thread. The string-o-rings will curl less if you 1) ease up on the tension on the 1st side; 2) make the 2nd side by the padded ring method (I just do the 2nd half of the stitch, so it's a 'half-padded ring'), or 3) alter your stitch count so there are more stitches on the 2nd side than the 1st. The 3rd suggestion is not always feasible, though. My personal favorite, though, is 4) design with the curve in mind. Knowing its natural tendency to curve towards the 2nd side, you can take advantage of it with designs that feature the curve (see my Friendship Angel, published on The Palmetto Tatters Guild Pattern CD, Tat Days 2009 - available from The Palmetto Tatters Guild [shameless plug])

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  5. Jane,

    What a stunning necklace!!! Now I want to try it too. I have done a series of split rings for a bracelet and a necklace but never noticed that it curled on to one side. I will take a look at it tonight when I get home.

    Sunela

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  6. Jane from South Africa's necklace is just gorgeous. And the second two necklaces are so unique. I love the variety that tatting offers.

    As for the split ring issue, I have no idea. I'm very new to tatting and haven't even made a string of split rings yet! But I look forward to reading others' responses.

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  7. Those necklaces are fabulous! :)

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  8. Anonymous4:53 pm

    I really like the necklaces, is that pattern available somewhere? I haven't done many split rings, and this looks like a good way to practice. :)

    danezmom@embarqmail.com

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  9. Jenny5:21 pm

    I often use a string of split rings for bookmark tails and I've not had any problem with curving. I guess it's a tension issue or maybe caused by how tightly you pull up the split ring. I will see if I can get the curve effect next time I am using up thread ends
    Jenny

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  10. Mine curves toward the second side of the split ring as well. I usually add an extra stitch to the second side unless it's going to be obvious. The other thing I do is turn the work over after every ring so the second side worked is on the opposite from the second side worked on the preceding ring (if that even makes sense).

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  11. I realize it is in the construction of the stitches on both halves. Here is what I do so that the row of SRs don't curl. Make the stitches on the second half just a tad looser. After pulling the SR closed, give that thread a straight tug(without the stitches flipping back). If you feel that the second half looks a little flat then you might have to ad a half hitch at the beginning or end to compensate for this. Try it! Doesn't hurt.

    XOXO SOJ

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  12. They look fabulous, not sure why they curl, maybe a tension problem. sorry I cant help you but they look great necklaces Margaret

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  13. My first thought was tension. But I'm not a techno-person when it comes to tatting. However, I've never had split rings in a row curve. I have made SR necklaces, and a rosary and other SR items…no curve. But I do not have what one would consider 'tight' tension. I THOUGHT it was until I saw actual tight, neat work..mine is medium tension, I've decided. LOL
    I am not, however, an expert tatter nor a designer. xxxx P

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  14. I have always assumed the curve was happens because when you begin the second half, it is easy to snug that first stitch up real close, so there's not as much play in the thread between elements on that side. Maybe that's why not everyone sees the curve, depending on their tension.

    These are gorgeous necklaces. Jane should be proud of them.

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  15. They are constructed like my friendship bracelets. But these have a round of pearls in the center of 2 strips. Very nice!

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  16. Gorgeous, another one to try.

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